• 10 October 1909 Born in Breslau (then German Silesia) of Franciszek Ksawery Heymann, third child of Léontine Charlotte Goyet (French, born 1877 in Bourg en Bresse), wife of Marcin Heymann, German-Polish architect.
  • 1920 : Following the independence of the Polish Republic, the Heymann family settles in Warsaw. Death of Léontine Goyet. Marcin Heymann is the Prefect of Kutno, then Director of the province’s Urban Planning at the Higher Education Ministry. Franciszek attends the local high school.
  • 1927 : Registration at the Applied School of Fine Arts in Poznan. Joins the undercover Polish Communist Party after a short passage via the TUR (workers’ universities union) and the leftist PPS (Polish Socialist Party). Arrested for handing out pamphlets, calling for the young recruits to get involved and rebel.
  • 20 to 21st October 1928. Trial. Sentenced to nine months of stronghold prison. Released after six months.
  • 1929 Studies at the Cracow School of Fine Arts ; sent to Berlin by the Communist Party
  • 1930-1936 Recruited by the Komintern who « lends » him to the Secret Services of the Red Army, he travels throughout Europe accomplishing technical missions while pursuing his studies in several European universities, among them the Berlin Fine Arts Academy, the Paris Academy of Oriental Languages (Langues Orientales) receiving his diploma under an assumed name, Cambridge University in England (1932), the Academy of Oriental Languages of Narimanov in Moscow.
  • 13 April 1937 Liaison Agent with the Spanish Republicans in Valladolid.
  • 14 November 1937. Summoned to Moscow
  • From December 1937 to April 1939. Arrested in Moscow under the identity of Jacques Robertovitch Rossi, emprisoned at the Loubianka, then at the Boutyrka, and sentenced by the OSSO (OGPU Special Board) to 8 years of hard labor camp according to Article 58, line 6, that is to say, accused of spying for the French and Polish governments.
  • JPEG - 111 kb Arrested in Moscow, 19377 April 1939 Departure via a Stolypin freight car to an unknown destination that turns out to be the Arctic zone, passing via many transit prisons: Kirov, Sverdlosk, Novo Sibirsk, Omsk, Krasnoyarsk. Arrival at the transit camp of Krasnoyarsk on the Ienissei river. Convoy to the port of Doudinka, part of the Norilsk camp, 70th north parallel.
  • 1939 to 1947 Confinement to the Norilsk camp. His sentence officially ends in 1945, but is extended through a “special decree†“until further notice†. Conditional discharge 15 April 1947, coupled with the suspension to leave Norilsk.
  • From 1947 to 1949 He works in Norilsk (from 25 August 1947 to 22 June 1948 as an official translator, from 22 June 1948 to 29 September 1948 as geotechnician, and from 29 September 1948 to 20 March 1949 as photographer).
  • From 1949 to 1956. New arrest. Confinement in the pretrial prison of Norilsk where he goes on his first hunger strike in 1949 to obtain the official statement of his verdict. Transfer to the Krasnoyarsk prison. New sentence of 25 years in the Gulag for “spying for the French, the English and the Americans†. Brief stay in the Irkoutsk prison, then transfer to the Aleksandrovka Central. After Stalin’s death in 1953, second hunger strike to obtain his liberation. In 1955, transport to Moscow via various transit prisons (Irkoutsk, Krasnoyarsk, Novo Sibirsk, Smirnov, Ekaterinenbourg, Kirov, etc.). Central Penitentiary of Vladimir.